The End is Near!

Well, I’m back . . . but not for long. My blog is probably going to stay in it’s dull, stagnant state for the next month or so. But, there is a good reason why.

I’m almost done with my WiP!!! *Does an enthusiastic Macarena*

It’s a special feeling to be near the end. Special, and terrifying. We all know how important a kick-butt ending is. It’s HUGE! Arguably the most important part of the story. (Top two, at least)

So, I need some tips from all you brilliant writers out there. Any advice on how to write a slammin’ ending? Or just share your opinion on what makes a good ending. I’m all ears. :)

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16 Responses to The End is Near!

  1. I’m glad you are back despite dull or not and it never is! I started reading your blog cause I was amazed you were getting so much done late at night! ANd whoo hoo for almost being there!
    Endings?? A really satisfying tie-up–something that makes me say–yes.

  2. giddymomof6 says:

    LOL! I ALWAYS rush my endings and then go back and write it all back out. Also, I believe in massive closure–gimme closure! And if your heart is racing you’re doing awesome! Jenni

  3. Natalie says:

    I miss you! Renee, at least do one post a week. I can’t take you missing so much! At least chat with me online or something.

    Anyway, endings.

    1. Stay true to the characters.
    2. Tie up major story threads.
    3. Don’t go too fast.
    4. Enjoy it.

  4. Kiersten says:

    I couldn’t even BELIEVE when I saw that you had a new blog post. I was just thinking this morning, man, Renee NEVER blogs anymore. She’d better be close to finishing PAMR…

    And you ARE! Hooray!

    My only advice is don’t rush. I tend to rush on my endings, and those are the parts I have to go back and fill in the most.

    Also, it’s okay if endings are a little sad, or not everything has a pretty bow–they can be satisfying without being, cough cough breaking dawn, cough cough too perfect.

  5. JaneyV says:

    I can’t help as I am still firmly stuck in the middle. But I would say go with your instincts. You know your characters. Do them justice.

    What a cop out answer!

    PS I had my first Dr Pepper today. It tasted like cherries. I don’t like cherries. And yet at the end it was strangely moreish. I’m not sure Renee – not sure at all!

  6. I missed you!! And not just because of your amazing photoshop skills. I don’t think I’m a good one to give advice on endings. Mostly because I’ve written the ending to my first book three times and it’s still not right. But good luck. If your blog gets to dark I just might have to email you. :)

  7. Kimberly says:

    I’m all for closure but I get a bit twitchy if it’s too neat, you know? I like an ending that leaves at least some of it to my imagination. That makes me smile and wonder. The perfect ending for me is inbetween happily ever after and I wonder what happens next. Neither one or the other but somewhere in the middle…

  8. sraasch says:

    People have already said this, but it’s so true, I’ll say it again: s-s-s-slow it down. Slow, slow, slow. You’ve written an entire novel to get to this last scene — don’t make us leave too quickly! And it always helps to leave off with a kick-butt final sentence, something eerie and thought-provoking, or shiver-inducing.

  9. Lady Glamis says:

    Tie everything up, including all your symbolism and themes, internal dilemmas, external dilemmas. And deliver the ending you’ve promised.

    Prime example of what NOT to do is Breaking Dawn. She promised a huge fight through the whole book. Everything kept leading up to that and what did we get? Nada. URGH!!! *tears hair out*

    Anyway, yah. Congrats on finishing! I just finished mine. It’s not spectacular yet. But it’s a start. :)

  10. Joanne says:

    Congrats on nearing completion! In thinking of the endings that I like, they move me in some way. Some are poignantly sad; some leave me thinking for awhile, considering; and none are too pat. Best wishes for the perfect ending!

  11. Don’t feel like you have to stuff too much into the ending.

    It’s okay to leave some (small) things unresolved as long as you, as Lady Glamis says “deliver the ending you’ve promised.” :-)

    Good luck!

  12. jessie says:

    I’m with Jenni-all about the closure. I like stand-alone books. I don’t like waiting for a year to find out what happens next. Of course the closure can’t be too fast or too fake. I don’t know what I’m talking about. I haven’t even gotten to the middle of my book yet. Glad you’re back.

  13. Terri-Hey thanks :) And it’s true, I am the quintessential night owl.

    Jenni-Yes, closure! That’s a biggie. And, I’m going to aim for heart racing. We’ll see how I do. :)

    Natalie-I missed you too! I missed all of you guys. :)

    Kiersten-heh, yeah, I’ve become quite the dud on my posting haven’t I? Well, I’ll repent once PAMR is through. (Probably)

    Janey-I love that answer! It’s no cop out. Do your characters justice. That sums it up perfectly.

    And, oh my gosh, I can’t believe you finally had DP! And you didn’t like it?!?!?! I . . . I don’t know what to say! I can only beg you o give it another chance. Dr. Pepper deserves a second chance.

    Candice-Aw, you’re sweet. :)I’ll try not to go completely dark, but you can email me anytime!

    Kimberly-Awesome point! I’m totally the same way. Too much closure just feels forced. I like a touch bittersweet to ending. Those touch me more than the perfect happily ever after.

    Sara-Ah yes, the final sentence. That’s a huge one for me. That, and the first sentence. I wrestle with those, BIG time. Because, really, when they are done well, they just make you throw your hands into the air and say “Yes!” And, I want people to have that reaction.

    Glam-It’s the tie up that troubles me the most. I totally agree that they are vital, but it’s not easy. You have to not only think of a satisfying ending to the plot, but to the internal dilemas as well. And, if you can use your storywide symbolism, even better. It’s a lot to work out. But, so worth it, I think.

    Joanne-Yeah, that’s how I gage how good a book or movie is, am I still thinking about the next day? The next few days? Happy or sad, if I thought about it for a long time, it did it’s job.

    Miriam-True, true. It’s not easy to do, but when an author fails to accomplish it, it leaves the reader with a sour taste in their mouth. (prime example: the Twilight Series)

    Jessie-I’m seriously not a fan of the cliffhanger endings. I mean . . . I guess, sometimes they work, but I usually feel betrayed, like I read the whole story only to be suckered into reading the sequel. HATE that. I’ve read two books in the last few months (big, huge books) which left me hanging, and it actually made me so mad that I’ve refused to read the next in the series. Take that, author!

  14. In other unrelated news… Totally Twins. I just saw your comment on Kiersten’s site. The Sixth Sense stuck with me way longer than a lot of movies that most people would consider scarier. I just couldn’t stop thinking about it.

  15. Exactly! It was SO jarring, and sad, and scary! And it’s more than the twist at the end. That was actually ruined for me before I even saw the movie (lame, huh?). So, it wasn’t even that. It was just the overall feel of the movie and the story.

  16. Katie says:

    great advice. I am about to tackle the ending in mine. I have given myself a deadline of mid June, so I don’t have any tips for you myself.

    But yay! Congrats! Finishing a book is a MAJOR accomplishment!